Browsed by
Category: Terminology

Start ….To Be Organized

Start ….To Be Organized

                                 HOW TO  GET  STARTED ………. TO BE ORGANIZED
Here are some important guidelines on how become a responsible partner and learn to control your health decisions. All of us need to be the manager of our own health, or we need a family member or advocate who is familiar with our health situation.

Be Prepared, a three-ring binder will help you keep track of your doctors, nurses, and insurance issues, as well as your medications. Keep all information Current. When you list your medications add Over the Counter as well. Take your up to date note book with you so that when you write down your questions leave space for answers and have the MD stay until you understand his answers

Embrace Your Mortality – When we recognize the process of life we can choose to live our life according to what we value, what is important to each of us? Life is meant to be fulfilling, meant to be enjoyed.  By recognizing that life is not infinite, we are able to better focus on what makes life meaningful in each of our lives and living the life we want instead of waiting until “later” to enjoy our lives.  Aging with Dignity PO Box 1661 Tallahassee, FL

Decide what is MOST Important To You and what are you willing to give up getting it? When we are active participants in our healthcare, life has more meaning and fulfillment.  The Guide to Talk with your Doctor NIH Institute on Aging Brochure number No.05-3452 is a great help.   If you are concerned that you may not be able to ask, take a family member of a friend who will be willing to make sure you get your answers.

Ask questions that are focused on the significance of illness or condition. Your physician may focus on the disease process.  The more important focus, for you, is likely what is the significance of the illness or condition in your life; how may it impact your ability to do the things your love to do? A helpful Guide is NIH publication NO.08-7105 MD’s Talking with Older Patients

Ask your family what they understand about your wishes. Use advance care directives as a starting point for the conversation – Five Wishes is an excellent resource to open the conversation about what each of us wants for our future. It allows a person to specify what matters to them, in writing, so that there is no confusion in the future.  These conversations can be hard and families do not like talking about “bad things” but understanding one another’s goals and wishes can avoid a great deal of stress and uncertainty in the future

FIVE WISHES is available through Aging with Dignity PO Box 1661 Tallahassee, FL 32302 or can be obtained locally (free of charge) from Hospice & Palliative Care Palmetto Region (HPCPR) by calling at  803 548 3708 ask for Melissa.  HPCPR is available to provide one-on-one discussion regarding Five Wishes or for small group discussion as well (free of charge).

Decide who will have a say in what happens to you if you cannot speak for yourself….…but only choose person to make decisions for you. Because being the decision maker for a loved one can be difficult; it’s important to choose someone, who understands your goals and wishes and is willing to follow through on what you want. Choose someone you trust to make decisions, on your behalf, should you be unable to speak for yourself.  Often times family members disagree on what decisions should be made and allow emotions to speak, having one person named, whom you trust to carry out your wishes, guarantees that what you want is respected. Info available through Education in Palliative and Ed-of-Life Care (EPEC) 750 N Lake Shore Dr Suite 601 Chicago IL 60661
This information is made available by Hospice & Palliative Care of Palmetto Region

Medical Health History. How do I write mine?

Medical Health History. How do I write mine?

To create a detailed health history you should include:

•Individual contact information for each of your physician practices ie.. orthopedic, arthritis, gynecology, cardiac, internal medicine, neurology etc.
•Each section should include test results that have been done in the past such as any lab test, blood work, EKG, scans, MRI’s.
•Highlight past complications to surgeries and include anesthesia difficulties.
•Document activities you are currently doing to focus on a healthy lifestyle.
•Encourage to give a real account of daily alcohol and drug use.
•Specifically document if they are ½ dosing of medications
•Give specific drug sensitivities and allergies
•Be as specific as possible on family past medical history including age and cause of death.

Healthcare Terminology

Healthcare Terminology

Advance Care Directive – a written statement of a person’s wishes regarding medical treatment, often including a living will, made to ensure those wishes are carried out should the person be unable to communicate them to a doctor.

Living Will – A written document that allows a patient to give explicit instructions about medical treatment to be administered when the patient is terminally ill or permanently unconscious; also called an advance directive.

Health Care Power of Attorney – Legal authorization for one person to represent another’s wishes regarding medical treatment and care should that person become unable to do so for themselves. Health care power of attorney names the agent as a representative authorized to make decisions regarding care and procedures as stated by the individual.  Each state has their own HCPOA form and you should update your form to reflect your state of residence.  During travel, most states will honor the HCPOA from your home state.

DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) – Do not resuscitate (DNR), or no code, is a legal order written either in the hospital or on a legal form to withhold cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or advanced cardiac life support (ACLS), in respect of the wishes of a patient in case their heart were to stop or they were to stop breathing.  This form DOES NOT address any other form of medical care and does not affect any ongoing treatment options.  Each state has its own DNR form and they DO NOT transfer from state to state.   The form must be presented as an original, no copies.

SC – South Carolina Emergency Medical Do Not Resuscitate Order (on white paper)

NC – Goldenrod (on bright gold paper)

MOST (Medical Order for Scope of Treatment
A NC (only) form for use by physicians and other licensed healthcare facilities to assist in providing information relating to a patient’s desire for resuscitation or life-prolonging measures. These forms are available only to physicians’ offices or other licensed hospital or healthcare facilities. The form is not transferable to other states and must be an original (bright pink form).

Five Wishes- Five Wishes is America’s most popular living will because it’s written in everyday language and helps people express their wishes in areas that matter most — the personal and spiritual in addition to the medical and legal. It also helps you describe what good care means to you, whether you are seriously ill or not. It allows your caregiver to know exactly what you want.  Families also use Five Wishes to help start and guide family conversations about care in times of serious illness. Five Wishes is helpful for all adults – everyone over 18 years old – and anyone can start the conversation within a family. Sometimes it begins with grandparents and other times it is the younger family members who bring up the topic. Regardless of your age, you can bring this gift to your family.

8. Definitions that you Must Know

8. Definitions that you Must Know

Advance Care Directive – a written statement of a person’s wishes regarding medical treatment, often including a living will, made to ensure those wishes are carried out should the person be unable to communicate them to a doctor.

Living Will – A written document that allows a patient to give explicit instructions about medical treatment to be administered when the patient is terminally ill or permanently unconscious; also called an advance directive.

Health Care Power of Attorney – Legal authorization for one person to represent another’s wishes regarding medical treatment and care should that person become unable to do so for themselves. Health care power of attorney names the agent as a representative authorized to make decisions regarding care and procedures as stated by the individual.  Each state has their own HCPOA form and you should update your form to reflect your state of residence.  During travel, most states will honor the HCPOA from your home state

DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) – Do not resuscitate (DNR), or no code, is a legal order written either in the hospital or on a legal form to withhold cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or advanced cardiac life support (ACLS), in respect of the wishes of a patient in case their heart were to stop or they were to stop breathing.  This form DOES NOT address any other form of medical care and does not affect any ongoing treatment options.  Each state has its own DNR form and they DO NOT transfer from state to state.   The form must be presented as an original, no copies.

SC – South Carolina Emergency Medical Do Not Resuscitate Order (on white paper)

NC – Goldenrod (on bright gold paper)

MOST (Medical Order for Scope of Treatment) – A NC (only) form for use by physicians and other licensed healthcare facilities to assist in providing information relating to a patient’s desire for resuscitation or life-prolonging measures. These forms are available only to physicians’ offices or other licensed hospital or healthcare facilities. The form is not transferrable to other states and must be an original (bright pink form).

Five Wishes – Five Wishes is America’s most popular living will because it’s written in everyday language and helps people express their wishes in areas that matter most — the personal and spiritual in addition to the medical and legal. It also helps you describe what good care means to you, whether you are seriously ill or not. It allows your caregiver to know exactly what you want.  Families also use Five Wishes to help start and guide family conversations about care in times of serious illness. Five Wishes is helpful for all adults – everyone over 18 years old – and anyone can start the conversation within a family. Sometimes it begins with grandparents and other times it is the younger family members who bring up the topic. Regardless of your age, you can bring this gift to your family.

scclhs.com